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R.I.P.

 
This collection of obituaries is meant to honor those writers and editors we've lost within the past few months.
 

Gordon Anderson, veteran reporter and author, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 68. Anderson spent more than 20 years with The Bakersfield Californian, and wrote a weekly sports column during football season. He later wrote the book, "Without Mercy."

John Ardoin, veteran music critic and author, died from complications of lymphoma. He was 66. Ardoin spent more than three decades at The Dallas Morning News in Texas, writing articles about music. He also wrote four books.

Edward Bassett, journalism professor at five U.S. universities, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 72. The Freedom Forum presented Bassett with the top award for journalism school administrators in 1993.

Christine Beck, local news editor of the Ashbury Park Press in New Jersey, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 42.

Gould Beech, journalist and speechwriter, recently died of Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Beech co-founded the Southern Farmer magazine, and later worked as a political speechwriter and aide to Jim Folsom, a Democratic gubernatorial candidate in Alabama.

Edvins Beitiks, veteran reporter for the San Francisco Examiner, recently died from complications of myeloma. He was 56. Beitiks covered news and sports and reviewed books, film and music.

Leonardo Benvenuti, screenwriter, recently died of a heart attack. He was 77. Benvenuti wrote more than 200 scripts, including "Once Upon a Time in America" and "Marriage Italian Style."

Phil Berger, a sports writer, screenwriter and author, died from cancer. He was 59. Berger wrote dozens of books on sports, but his specialty was writing about boxing. He was the boxing writer for The New York Times, and wrote articles for the Village Voice and Playboy. His screenplay, "Price of Glory," a boxing movie, was produced last year.

Richard Bergholz, veteran political reporter for The Los Angeles Times, died of a stroke. He was 83. Bergholz spent 50 years covering American politics. He retired from The Times in 1985.

Susan Berman, author, playwright and screenwriter, was found dead on Dec. 24, 2000. She died of a single gunshot to the head. Berman was 55. The daughter of gangster Bugsy Siegel, Berman published two books about the Mob, "Easy Street" and "Lady Las Vegas: The Inside Story Behind America's Neon Oasis."

Luther F. Bliven, veteran political reporter for The Post-Standard in New York, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 85. Bliven started working for the newspaper in 1930, when he was still in high school, and spent 71 years there. Although he never became an officer of the Legislative Correspondents Association, the organization honored him with a lifetime membership.

Elene C. Brown, columnist and feature writer for the Daily Local News in Pennsylvania, recently died of cancer. She was 48. Brown's weekly column featured a humorous look at family issues.

Bill Caldwell, veteran columnist for the Portland Press Herald and the Maine Sunday Telegram, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 81.

Roger Caras, author, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 72. Caras wrote more than 60 books about animals, including "A Perfect Harmony: The Intertwining Lives of Animals and Humans Throughout History" and "The Bond." He was also the president emeritus of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Thomas G. Cekay, technology editor for the Chicago Tribune, died from cancer. He was 49. Cekay spent 18 years with the newspaper and helped to launch its Internet division. In 1986, he received the Johnrae Earl Award for excellence in editing.

Ronald Chetwynd-Hayes, horror novelist, died of bronchial pneumonia. He was 81. Known as "Britain's Prince of Chill," Chetwynd-Hayes spent more than three decades publishing ghost stories and humorous horror tales. He published over 200 short stories and more than 12 novels, and received the Life Achievement Award from both the British Fantasy Society and the Horror Writers of America.

Jeff Cole, aerospace editor for The Wall Street Journal, recently died in a plane crash. He was 45. Cole was flying in a private jet when it crashed after takeoff. He's worked as a reporter for The Journal since 1992, and also wrote for The Seattle Times.

Jim Coleman, veteran sports writer, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 89. Coleman, who was one of the best known sportswriters in Canada, spent 70 years writing articles and columns for a variety of newspapers. In 1985, he was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame.

Leo Connellan, poet laureate of Connecticut, died from a stroke. He was 72. Connellan achieved the post in 1996 after publishing the collections, "Crossing America," "Provincetown and Other Poems" and "The Clear Blue Lobster-Water Country." He also received three nominations for the Pulitzer Prize.

John Connelly, former wire editor for the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Dispatch in Minnesota, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 73. Connelly spent 36 years with the newspaper before retiring in 1990.

Charles P. Corn, editor and author, died of a stroke. He was 63. Before he retired from publishing in 1982, Corn worked as the editor-in-chief of E.P. Dutton Publishers. He edited the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, John Irving and Joyce Carol Oates. Corn also published the nonfiction book, "Distant Islands."

Gregory Corso, poet, recently died of prostate cancer. He was 70. Corso was best known for his beat poetry, particularly the 1958 poem, "Bomb." He wrote more than 20 collections of poetry and other works.

Louise Ran Costich, veteran reporter for The China Times in Taipei, recently died of ovarian cancer. She was 48. Costich worked in Washington D.C. as a political correspondent, and as the bureau chief for The Taipei Commercial Times. She also published the book, "A Decade of Trade Storms."

Kevin Crough, managing editor of the Bigfork Eagle in Montana, recently died. Cause of death was alcohol-related. He was 26. Crough also worked as the first coordinator of Entertainment NOW.

Bill Davidson, author and journalist, recently died after a stroke. He was 82. Davidson wrote 13 books, including "Cut Off," an account of his years as a correspondent in World War II.

L. Sprague de Camp, science fiction author, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 92. de Camp was a prolific writer -- he wrote more than 120 science fiction and fantasy books and several hundred short stories. He also won the Nebula Award, the Hugo Award and the Grand Master Award for Lifetime Achievement in Fantasy.

John Diamond, columnist for The Times in London, died of throat cancer. He was 47. Diamond's weekly lifestyle column eventually focused on how he dealt with his disease.

Gordon R. Dickson, science fiction author, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 77. Dickson was beyond prolific, writing more than 80 novels and publishing many short stories. Best known for his Childe Cycle series of novels, he was inducted into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2000. Dickson was president of the Science Fiction Writers of America from 1969 to 1971, and won three Hugos and a Nebula.

Candida Donadio, literary agent, died of cancer. She was 71. Donadio worked with Joseph Heller, Thomas Pynchon and Mario Puzo. Her first sale was Heller's book, "Catch 18," which was later renamed, "Catch 22." The number 22 was chosen to reflect Donadio's birthday.

Frederick Drimmer, writer and editor, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Drimmer was best known for writing and editing books on the macabre, including "Scalps and Tomahawks: Narratives of Indian Captivity" and "Body Snatchers, Stiffs, and Other Ghoulish Delights."

William Dwight, former president of the New England Daily Newspaper Association, and the editor/publisher of the Transcript-Telegram in Massachusetts, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 71. The newspaper closed in 1993.

Arlene Eisenberg, author, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 66. Eisenberg shot to fame after co-writing the best-selling book, "What to Expect When You're Expecting," with her daughters.

Julius J. Epstein, screenwriter, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 91. Epstein, who wrote more than 50 movies, won an Oscar for "Casablanca." Epstein won the Los Angeles Film Critics Association's career achievement award in 1998.

Rowland Evans, former syndicated columnist and editor, died of cancer. He was 79. Evans spent a decade covering politics for The Associated Press, and previously worked as an editor for Reader's Digest. In 1963, he and Robert Novak starting writing the political column, "Inside Report," which was eventually syndicated in 300 newspapers. The duo later took their opinions to CNN where they hosted the political interview show, "Evans & Novak."

John G. Fay, associate executive editor, arts editor and critic for the Mobile Press Register in Alabama, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Fay spent more than 40 years with the newspaper, until his retirement in 1986.

William Ferris, former reporter and editor for The Associated Press in Chicago and New York, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 89. Ferris also published the book, "The Grain Traders," a history of commodity futures trading.

Roland Flint, former poet laureate of Maryland, recently died from cancer. He was 66. Flint published six poetry collections and spent 29 years teaching English and creative writing at Georgetown University.

Bill Foley, veteran reporter, columnist and editor for The Florida Times-Union, died of cancer. He was 62. Foley, who was best known for writing historical essays, spent more than four decades with the Times-Union. His book, "The Great Fire of 1901," is scheduled for publication in May.

Al Fox, veteran political reporter for The Birmingham News in Alabama, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 77.

Edmund Maybank Fuller, author and literary critic for The Wall Street Journal, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 86. Fuller spent more than 30 years reviewing for The Journal.

Robert E. Garis, entertainment writer, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 75. Garis published articles on dance, literature and film in the Ballet Review, Partisan Review and The Nation. He also spent 43 years teaching English at Wellesley College.

Glen R. Geib, former editor of The News-Messenger in Ohio, recently died of cancer. He was 92. Geib edited the newspaper for 26 years.

Frank Gilbreth, author and columnist for The Post and Courier in South Carolina, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 89. Gilbreth spent over 50 years writing the "Doing the Charleston" column under the pen name Ashley Cooper. He also wrote the books, "Cheaper by the Dozen" and "Belles on Their Toes," both of which were made into movies.

Richard Harnett, former bureau manager for United Press International in San Francisco, Calif., died. Cause of death was not released. He was 74. Harnett also taught journalism at San Francisco State and De Anza College.

Radie Harris, veteran columnist for The Hollywood Reporter, died of pneumonia. She was 96. Harris spent almost half a century writing the "Broadway Ballyoo" column. She was also a longtime reporter for CBS radio, known for broadcasting her show live from the swank Sardi's restaurant in New York City.

Richard Harwood, veteran reporter, editor and ombudsman for The Washington Post, died of cancer. He was 75. Harwood won the George Polk Memorial Award and the Distinguished Service Medal of Sigma Delta Chi for reporting. In 1997, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists.

Robert Hipple, former editor and publisher of the Daily Capital Journal in Pierre, S.D., died. Cause of death was not released. He was 100. After his father's death, Hipple took over as editor and publisher of the newspaper in 1939. In 1983, he won the South Dakota Newspaper Association's Distinguished Service Award.

Charles Jackson, former editor of The Oakland Tribune in California, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 55. Jackson spent 35 in the newspaper industry and focused his energies on encouraging equality in the newsroom.

Howard Kaplan, veteran columnist, editor and reporter for The Denver Post, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 74. Kaplan spent 31 years with The Post, and retired in 1991.

Burt Kennedy, screenwriter, died of cancer. He was 78. Kennedy worked as a successful radio writer after World War II, wrote screenplays for Hollywood and later became a director.

Herbert Kupferberg, music critic and senior editor of Parade Magazine, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Kupferberg spent 20 years with The New York Herald Tribune and then joined Parade in 1966. He also published reviews for The Atlantic Monthly and several books about music.

Ring Lardner Jr., screenwriter, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 85. Lardner, the son of author Ring Lardner, was the last surviving member of the Hollywood 10, a group of writers, producers and directors who were blacklisted in the 1950s. Lardner Jr. shared a best original screenplay Oscar with Michael Kanin for the film, "Woman of the Year." He won a second Academy Award for best screenplay for his adaptation of the Richard Hooker novel, "M*A*S*H."

Jacques Laurent, a French writer, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 81. Laurent won the Prix Goncourt in 1971 for his book, "The Follies." However, he was best known for the book, "Dear Caroline," a romance he wrote under the pen name Cecil Saint-Laurent. It was later adapted into a film starring Martine Carol.

Robert Laxalt, author, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 77. Laxalt wrote 14 books, including "A Cup of Tea in Pamplona," which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He also worked as the director of the University of Nevada Press, which he founded in 1961.

Richard Laymon, horror author, died of a massive heart attack. He was 54. Laymon wrote 25 novels, and published more than 60 short stories.

Phyllis Levy, book editor for Good Housekeeping, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 69. Levy previously worked at Simon & Schuster, where she helped discover Ken Kesey, author of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."

Anne Morrow Lindbergh, author, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 95. When her husband, Charles Lindbergh, set his 1930 transcontinental speed record, Anne, who was seven months pregnant at the time, was in the cockpit providing radio and weather information. The couple were celebrated around the world as heroes until 1932, when they became tragic figures after their son was kidnapped and murdered. To cope with the death of her child, Anne became a writer. She is best known for her books, "Gift From the Sea," "The War Within and Without" and "Listen! the Wind."

Robert Ludlum, spy novelist, died of a heart attack. He was 73. Ludlum sold more than 210 million books, which mostly focused on government secrets and corruption. His publisher said readers can expect at least three more novels.

Patrick W. Lynch, veteran reporter and columnist for various Hearst newspapers, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 84.

G. Edward Maroon, veteran sports columnist for The Sun-Journal in Maine, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 77. Maroon wrote the popular "Mr. Downtown" column, and founded the Central Maine Football Forecasters Association.

Sam Malone, veteran journalist, editor and columnist, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 79. Malone spent 60 years in journalism writing for The Seminole Sentinel, The Daily Sentinel and the Sabine County Reporter in Texas. Malone wrote the weekly "Ramblin' Round" column and broadcast a 15-minute radio news show on KLCR-FM six days a week for more than three decades.

Abigail McCarthy, political writer, died of breast cancer. She was 85. Although she wrote about religion and women's issues, McCarthy is best known for the book, "Private Faces/Public Faces." McCarthy was married to former Sen. Eugene McCarthy.

Maxine Mesinger, veteran society columnist for The Houston Chronicle in Texas, recently died from complications of multiple sclerosis. She was 75. Mesinger took over the local gossip column in 1959. Her last column was published on Dec. 17, 2000.

Ian Moffitt, veteran journalist and author, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 71. Although he worked as a war correspondent, reporter and columnist, Moffitt was best known as a feature writer for The Australian and the former Daily Mirror in Sydney. He also published the books, "The U-Jack Society" and "The Retreat of Radiance."

John T. Norman, veteran correspondent for the AP-Dow Jones Newswire, recently died of cancer. He was 82. Norman was the service's first and only Washington correspondent for 23 years, until his retirement in 1990.

Jack O'Brian, newspaper columnist and critic, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 86. O'Brian wrote about television, Broadway and soap operas. He joined The Associated Press in 1943 as a drama and movie critic and later syndicated his column.

Terrence O'Flaherty, veteran TV critic for The San Francisco Chronicle, died from pancreatic cancer. He was 83. O'Flaherty spent more than 35 years with the newspaper. In 1988, he received the only Emmy ever given by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to a television critic.

Faunce Pendexter, veteran journalist, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 85. Pendexter spent 40 years working for the Lewiston Evening Journal and the Lewiston Daily Sun in Maine. He won awards for editorial writing in 1981 and 1982 from the New England Associated Press News Executives Association.
Arturo Uslar Pietri, Venezuelan novelist and essayist, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 94. Pietri is best-known for his debut novel, "Las Lanzas Coloradas," although he later wrote almost 50 more. He spent several years teaching Latin American literature at Columbia University, and also wrote the weekly column, "Pizarra," for El Nacional newspaper. In 1963, Pietri ran for president and lost.

Charles Pou, former reporter for The Atlanta Journal in Georgia, died of kidney failure. He was 83. Pou covered politics and crime from 1948 to 1970 .
Nancy Powell, journalist, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 80. Powell was the first woman hired by The Palm Beach Post in Florida to cover hard news.

Ann Przelomski, former city and managing editor of The Vindicator in Ohio, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 82. Przelomski spent 46 years working as a journalist and editor in newspapers, and was inducted into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame in 1986.

Thomas Pryor, former editor of Daily Variety, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 89. Pryor spent almost 30 years with the magazine, until he retired in 1988. For three decades before that, he covered the film industry for The New York Times.

Vincent J. Quatrini, veteran reporter for the Latrobe Bulletin in Pennsylvania, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 77. Quatrini, who covered everything from sports to entertainment, spent almost 50 years writing for the newspaper.

Pat Reese, veteran reporter for the Fayetteville Observer in N.C., recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 73. Reese, who joined the newspaper in 1957, was best known for his coverage of crime and politics. In 1983, he was shot by the director of the country mental center, a man who later killed himself.

Charles Rembar, writer and literary agent, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 85. His writings appeared in Atlantic Monthly, Esquire and The New York Times. An ardent opponent of censorship, Rembar received a George Polk Memorial journalism award for his book, "The End of Obscenity."

Mario Rossi, veteran columnist for The Post-Standard in New York, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Although he retired in 1982, Rossi still wrote two weekly columns and part of the newspaper's opinion page.

Sam Savitt, author and artist, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Savitt published 15 coffee table and children's books, and illustrated 150 books for other writers. He was the official artist of the United States Equestrian Team, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the North American Horseman's Association in 1988.

Virginia Spiller, former reporter and columnist for The San Diego Union in California, died of cancer. She was 86. Spiller, who previous worked as the women's editor of the El Centro Post-Press, was also the former president of the California Press Women. She retired in 1992.

Elizabeth Daniels Squire, mystery author, died. Cause of death is unclear. She was 74. Squire published seven books based on her character, amateur sleuth Peaches Dann.

John Steadman, sportswriter and columnist, died of cancer. He was 73. Steadman attended every NFL game played by Baltimore, Md. teams in the past 50 years. He previously worked as the sports editor of the News-Post and as a columnist for The Evening Sun and The Sun. He was also the president of the Pro Football Writers Association of America. He won three Freedom Foundation medals and wrote seven books.

John Lewis Stone, former editor of the Muskogee Daily Phoenix in Oklahoma, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Stone spent three decades in journalism before his retirement in 1981. He was also a past president of the Oklahoma Press Association.

Glenna Syse, veteran drama critic for the Chicago Sun-Times, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 73. Syse reviewed theatre, movies, ballet and television for the Sun-Times for more than 30 years. She retired in the late '80s.

Virginia C. Tracy, journalist, recently died. Cause of death was not released. She was 97. Tracy specialized in feature writing, and interviewed celebrities like Charles Lindbergh, Cary Grant and Alfred Hitchcock. She published articles in The Catholic Review, The Baltimore Sun, The St. Louis Globe, The Evening Sun and the Baltimore News American. She retired in 1970.

Jacqueline Irene Villa, former copy editor for The Arizona Daily Star in Arizona, died. Cause of death was not released. She was 83. Villa spent more than 25 years editing for Newsday, The Nassau Review-Star and The Long Island Press in New York before moving out west. She retired from The Arizona Daily Star in 1999.

Louis H. Wacker, former city editor of the Buffalo Evening News in New York, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 82. Before retiring from journalism in 1977, Wacker covered politics and travel. He also conducted interviews with servicemen on the front lines during the Korean War. Wacker edited for the newspaper for 20 years before teaching journalism at Buffalo State College.

Auberon Waugh, writer and journalist, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 61. Son of novelist Evelyn Waugh, Auberon made a name for himself in British tabloids. He also founded the Literary Review.

Robert B. Wellington, former editor and publisher of The Ottawa Herald in Kansas, died of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 78. Wellington ran the newspaper from 1961 to 1987.

Ed Wishcamper, former editor of The Abilene Reporter-News in Texas, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 83. Wishcamper joined the Reporter-News in 1936 as a journalist and 32 years later became its editor and vice president.
 
Frank Wilder, editor of The Patriot Ledger in Massachusetts, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 51. Wilder previously worked for the Boston Herald, the North Wyoming Daily News in Wyoming and the Biddeford Journal Tribune in Maine.
Paul Winterton, mystery novelist, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 92. Winterton, writing under the name Andrew Garve, published more than 30 novels, including "Murder in Moscow" and "Megstone Plot." He also wrote the book, "Two if by Sea," under the name Roger Bax, which was later made into the Clark Gable and Gene Tierney film, "Never Let Me Go." Winterton founded the Crime Writers' Association in 1953.

Gavin Young, veteran reporter and travel writer, recently died. Cause of death was not released. He was 72. Young spent three decades writing for The Observer in the U.K., where he covered international news in Vietnam, Angola, Yemen and Congo. His book, "In Search of Conrad" won the Thomas Cook Award.
 

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